PREDILETOS DE 2014: DISCOS, FILMES, LIVROS & SHOWS [A CASA DE VIDRO.COM]

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Aí vai, meu povo, uma “retrospectiva cult” do ano que acaba de terminar, em forma de listão de prediletos-da-casa; aí estão reunidas algumas das novidades culturais que mais marcaram meu 2014: são álbuns nacionais e internacionais, filmes de ficção e documentários, além de livros publicados recentemente, que eu prezo pra valer e estimo como alguns dos melhores lançamentos destes últimos tempos… Voilà!

DISCOS

[NACIONAIS]

* JUÇARA MARÇAL, “Encarnado”

* CRIOLO, “Convoque Seu Buda”

* CARNE DOCE, “Carne Doce”

* DIEGO MASCATE, “A.C.”

* CEUMAR, “Silencia”

* FAR FROM ALASKA, “Mode Human”

* TAGORE, “Movido a Vapor”

*ESTRELINSKI E OS PAULERA, “Leminskanções”

* NÔMADE ORQUESTRA, “Idem”

* RUSSO PASSAPUSSO, “Paraíso da Miragem”

* * * * *

[INTERNACIONAIS]

* TEMPLES, “Sun Structures”

* THE WAR ON DRUGS, “Lost in the Dream”

* ROGER DALTREY & WILKO JOHNSON, “Going Back Home”

* SHARON VAN ETTEN, “Are We There?”

* DEATH FROM ABOVE 1979, “The Physical World”

* ST. VINCENT, “St. Vincent”

* * * * *

SHOWS

* Queens of the Stone Age, Festival d’été de Québec
* Layla Zoe, Festival International de Jazz de Montréal
* Deltron 3030, Fest. de Jazz de Montréal
* Carne Doce, Festival Juriti de Música e Poesia Encenada
* Jello Biafra and the Guantanamo School of Medicine, Toronto’s Opera House
* Soundgarden, Festival d’été de Québec
* The Kills, Festival d’été de Québec


* * * * *

FILMES

[FICÇÃO]

Snowpiercer-Poster

– SNOWPIERCER: EXPRESSO DO AMANHÃ, de Joon-ho Bong
– NINFOMANÍACA, de Lars Von Trier
– O LOBO ATRÁS DA PORTA, de F. Coimbra
– WE ARE THE BEST, de Lukas Moodyson
– BOYHOOD, de Richard Linklater
– RIOCORRENTE, de Paulo Sacramento
– MAPS TO THE STARS, de David Cronenberg
– LUCY, de Luc Besson
– NIGHTCRAWLER, de Dan Gilroy

missing-picture_poster

[DOCUMENTÁRIOS]

– THE MISSING PICTURE, de Rithy Pahn
– JE SUIS FEMEN, de Alain Margot
– WATCHERS OF THE SKY, de Edet Belzberg
– FAITH CONNECTIONS, de Pan Nalin
– FINDING FELA KUTI, de Alex Gibney
– THE INTERNET’S OWN BOY: STORY OF AARON SCHWARTZ, by B. Knappenberger
– BJÖRK: BIOPHILIA LIVE
– PARTICLE FEVER, de Mark A. Levinson
TEENAGE, de Matt Wolf

[LIVROS]

thischangeseverything

– NAOMI KLEIN, This Changes Everything
– 
ARUNDHATI ROY, Capitalism: A Ghost Story
– 
EDUARDO VIVEIROS DE CASTRO E DÉBORAH DANOWSKI, Há Mundo Por Vir?
– PETER LINEBAUGH, Stop, Thief! – The Commons, Enclosures and Resistance
– 
RAJ PATEL, The Value of Nothing
– 
RODRIGO SAVAZONI, Os Novos Bárbaros – A Aventura Política do Fora do Eixo

[MELHOR ESCRITOR DESCOBERTO E LIDO PELA PRIMEIRA VEZ EM 2014…]

Arundhati RoyARUNDHATI ROY

 

Aaron Swartz (1986-2013): assista o documentário e leia o manifesto Open Access

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“Guerilla Open Access Manifesto”,
by Aaron Swartz (1986-2013)

Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves. The world’s entire scientific and cultural heritage, published over centuries in books and journals, is increasingly being digitized and locked up by a handful of private corporations. Want to read the papers featuring the most famous results of the sciences? You’ll need to send enormous amounts to publishers like Reed Elsevier.

There are those struggling to change this. The Open Access Movement has fought valiantly to ensure that scientists do not sign their copyrights away but instead ensure their work is published on the Internet, under terms that allow anyone to access it. But even under the best scenarios, their work will only apply to things published in the future. Everything up until now will have been lost.

That is too high a price to pay. Forcing academics to pay money to read the work of their colleagues? Scanning entire libraries but only allowing the folks at Google to read them? Providing scientific articles to those at elite universities in the First World, but not to children in the Global South? It’s outrageous and unacceptable.

“I agree,” many say, “but what can we do? The companies hold the copyrights, they make enormous amounts of money by charging for access, and it’s perfectly legal — there’s nothing we can do to stop them.” But there is something we can, something that’s already being done: we can fight back.

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Aaron Swartz (1986-2013)

Those with access to these resources — students, librarians, cientists — you have been given a privilege. You get to feed at this banquet of knowledge while the rest of the world is locked out. But you need not — indeed, morally, you cannot — keep this privilege for yourselves. You have a duty to share it with the world. And you have: trading passwords with colleagues, filling download requests for friends.

Meanwhile, those who have been locked out are not standing idly by. You have been sneaking through holes and climbing over fences, liberating the information locked up by the publishers and sharing them with your friends.

But all of this action goes on in the dark, hidden underground. It’s called stealing or piracy, as if sharing a wealth of knowledge were the moral equivalent of plundering a ship and murdering its crew. But sharing isn’t immoral — it’s a moral imperative. Only those blinded by greed would refuse to let a friend make a copy.

Large corporations, of course, are blinded by greed. The laws under which they operate require it — their shareholders would revolt at anything less. And the politicians they have bought off back them, passing laws giving them the exclusive power to decide who can make copies.

There is no justice in following unjust laws. It’s time to come into the light and, in the grand tradition of civil disobedience, declare our opposition to this private theft of public culture.

We need to take information, wherever it is stored, make our copies and share them with the world. We need to take stuff that’s out of copyright and add it to the archive. We need to buy secret databases and put them on the Web. We need to download scientific journals and upload them to file sharing networks. We need to fight for Guerilla Open Access.

With enough of us, around the world, we’ll not just send a strong message opposing the privatization of knowledge — we’ll make it a thing of the past. Will you join us?

Aaron Swartz
July 2008, Eremo, Italy

https://archive.org/stream/GuerillaOpenAccessManifesto/Goamjuly2008_djvu.txt

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The Internet’s Own Boy – The Story of Aaron Swartz

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